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Why does the is the rate of acceleration not consistent even within the accelrating system? : Physics

Why does the is the rate of acceleration not consistent even within the accelrating system? : Physics


Full disclosure: I have no idea what I’m talking about. I know very little about physics or mathematics I’ve just researched this particular topic a little bit because of a scene in a book that didn’t seem to add up to me. Well, if I knew this, I wouldn’t have to ask. My point is, bear with me even if this is the dumbest question you’ve ever read on here, please.

The other day I came across this essay about relativistic speeds:

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SR/Rocket/rocket.html

In it, it is said that a relativistic rocket, constantly accelerating at a rate of 1g, would need about 12 years in its own time or 113,243 years for a motionless observer to reach 0.99999999996 c and cross 113,242 lightyears.

Now, what I don’t understand about this (as I said, I am not exactly a mathematician) is why this would take so long in the rocket’s own time, which I will call Tr. If for every second Tr the Rocket gains 9.81 m/s in speed, then, with pre-relativity math, you’d just divide the speed of light by the acceleration and get a Tr that could never happen, as I had previously understood it. That would be Tr ≈ 353.7 days.

I figured that meant the ship would simply never reach that point, dilating time as relativity does. But according to the Essay, years, even decades, can pass for the rocket while it accelerates at 1g.

How can that be, considering 354 days at a constant acceleration of 1g would bring you to a speed of 300044736 m/s, more than the speed of light? The acceleration can’t be slowed down, either, since then it wouldn’t be a constant acceleration s was implied in the essay.

Thanks in advance.



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